Huguenots

A Momentous Occasion – 400-Year Anniversary

It is indeed a momentous occasion for America. Four hundred years ago, on November 11, 1620, the Pilgrims came ashore on land. That is now in Provincetown on Cape Cod. The Pilgrims’ story is a central theme in the history and culture of the United States of America. The Pilgrim Fathers were that band of Puritans who founded the colony of Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620.

A pilgrim is defined a person who journeys a long distance to some sacred place as an act of devotion. They were escaping religious persecution and going to the Promised Land.

The Pilgrims Landing

“PROVINCETOWN – The year 1620 is etched in the annals of world history. It is the year a group of English settlers known as the Pilgrims seeking religious freedom boarded their ship, Mayflower. They braved a hazardous trip across the Atlantic Ocean to establish a new home.”

Plymouth Rock etched with the year 1620
Plymouth Rock – 1620

Seeing this date etched in Plymouth Rock is like seeing the writing on the Wall. “Mene, mene, teckel, upharsin” in the time of Daniel spelled the end for the Babylonian king. It marks an especially important date for the people of God.

Saint Bartholomew Remembered

Bartholomew was an Apostle of Jesus Christ. And with this story, comes the legend of the children of Israel, that is Jacob, son of Isaac, son of Abraham. It highlights a portion in time when the people of God were in transgression and had been scattered throughout the earth, as they are to this day. For their help, He sent them His servants, the Prophets, His own son, Jesus, and his Apostles. In most every instance, they have been met with hostility and persecution because what they had to say was not well received. But they persevered because they had been sent by God Himself to correct His people and turn them back to Him.

August 24, is celebrated and remembered throughout Christendom as the feast day of the Apostle, Bartholomew. He was numbered among the twelve original Apostles who followed Jesus and were witnesses to all that he said and did. Before he died, Jesus sent them out to teach their brethren all things he had taught them. They were all tortured and killed, as Jesus was, for their testimony except one. That one was John who was exiled and from whom we have the Book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, the last book of the Bible. Jesus had twelve Apostles, one for each of the twelve tribes of the House of Israel/Jacob. Bartholomew was also known in the Gospels as Nathaniel. Jesus pointed to him and said, “Behold! an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!” (John 1:47)

According to ancient tradition, Christianity was first preached in Armenia by two Apostles of Christ, Thaddeus and Bartholomew. During the first three centuries of Christianity in Armenia its followers had to remain a hidden congregation because of persecution. Indeed Christ led his followers into being persecuted for his name’s sake, as were the Prophets before him. He had told them before-time to expect it. Even Paul/Saul persecuted followers of Christ before his conversion and then after that he himself was killed. (Acts 7-8)

martyrdom of Bartholomew
The Martyrdom of St. Bartholomew
Scroll to Top