Not The Apostles Creed

The Apostles Creed is recognizable to most “Christians” in the world.

Does this sound familiar?

“I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth.  I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the virgin Mary…”

The creed is recited as part of the Roman Catholic Mass and baptism.  The Episcopalians, Lutherans and Methodists also recite the creed as part of their baptism rituals.  It may come as a surprise to the laity in the Protestant branches of Christianity to learn that Catholics recite the Apostles Creed and vice versa.  Why?  Because the Apostles Creed is a “statement of faith” and these different religions are taught that their religion is the correct religion, yet they all have the same “statement of faith.”  Even more surprising is that this creed cannot be found in the Bible or in any other writings by the Apostles.  So, where did it come from?

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Reformation or Re-Branding?

October 31st, 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation.  Five hundred years ago, Martin Luther published his 95-theses document challenging doctrines of the Catholic church.  The importance placed on the practice of selling indulgences, the false security it gave to those who purchased them and the true destination of the collected money offended Luther.

Martin Luther’s 95 Theses

Martin Luther’s 2nd These states “This word (“repent”) cannot be understood as referring to the sacrament of penance, that is, confession and satisfaction, as administered by the clergy.”  These 35 states “They who teach that contrition is not necessary on the part of those who intend to buy souls out of purgatory or to buy confessional privileges, preach unchristian doctrine.”

Luther greatly missed the mark by not denying the existence of purgatory or the ability of the church to sell indulgences.  He was just alarmed that “Indulgence Preachers” were selling indulgences as a catch-all for anyone and any sin even if there was no remorse or contriteness.  In addition, more importance was placed on selling indulgences than teaching the Catholic church’s interpretation of the Word of God.  Luther’s These 53 states “They are the enemies of Christ and the pope who forbid altogether the preaching of the Word of God in some churches in order that indulgences may be preached in others.”

Martin Luther points to the true purpose of indulgences, funding the building of St. Peters Basilica in Rome.  His 86th These states “Again, ‘Why does not the pope, whose wealth is today greater than the wealth of the richest Crassus, build this one basilica of St. Peter with his own money rather than with the money of poor believers?’”

Basilica of St. Peter – Built with Funds Raised from Indulgences

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