communion

The Firstfruits

God told Moses to speak to the children of Israel concerning His feasts:

In the fourteenth day of the first month at evening is the Lord’s Passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days you must eat unleavened bread. … When you are come into the land which I give unto you, and shall reap the harvest thereof, then you shall bring a sheaf of the firstfruits of your harvest unto the priest.”

Leviticus 23:5-10
parable of wheat
“…but gather the wheat into my barn…” Parable of the Wheat and the Tares” Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43

Does God require that you bring the first stalks of wheat that come out of your garden?  What if you can’t grow wheat?  Does that make you unacceptable? This seems silly.  There must be more to this than what’s on the surface.  Let’s take a look at other places in God’s word to see if we can gain a better understanding of what’s being said here…

Flesh & Blood, or Cracker & Grape Juice?

The Eucharist (i.e. Communion) is a ritual, which has been performed in religious masses all over the world for millennia.  The ritualistic rite of eating a cracker and drinking wine has been practiced since Babylon under the rule of Nimrod, King of Babylon.  In the Vatican, the Pope now wears that same crown of “Mystery, Babylon the Great” and holds, “a golden cup in her hand, making all nations drunk with the wine of her fornication” (Rev 17:2-5, 18:3).

Man shall not live by bread alone

Catholics and many religious sects are told that priests have the power to transform a cracker and wine into the flesh and blood of Jesus.  Protestants practice the same ritual but believe that the bread and wine are a symbol of Jesus.  Yet, the very man they think they’re reverencing by eating a piece of bread said:

“It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.” Matthew 4:4

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