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Dwell in the Tabernacle of God

Primitive shelter made of interwoven branches

Feast of Tabernacles

The Feast of Tabernacles is the third and final Hebrew pilgrim festival called for by God.  Also known as the Feast of Ingathering, it follows the Feast of Unleavened Bread, and the Feast of Weeks.  It has been observed by Hebrews for generations and will occur this year from October 2nd through October 9th, 2020.  What is the Feast of Tabernacles and what is its significance?

After Israel was delivered out of their oppression by Moses, the LORD made them to dwell in tabernacles.  In Hebrew these dwellings were called succoth which means ‘booths,’ ‘tents,’ or ‘tabernacles.’  The temporary shelters were made of interwoven branches that protected them in the wilderness.

“And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, Speak to the children of Israel, saying, The fifteenth day of this seventh month shall be the feast of tabernacles for seven days unto the LORD… You shall dwell in booths seven days; all that are Israelites born shall dwell in booths: That your generations may know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.”

Leviticus 23:33-43
Modern sukkah

The Spirit of Truth

Illuminating the Word of God

Seven weeks and a day have passed since the time of Passover.  To Christians, this day is referred to as Pentecost and is remembered as the day when the apostles received the Holy Spirit.  It was first celebrated by the Israelites seven weeks after they were passed over by the last plague and delivered out of oppression.   It has been known as the Feast of Weeks throughout generations of Hebrews ever since.  The disciples of Y’hoshua observed this time, just as their forefathers had, as stated in the Acts of the Apostles.

The Passover Lamb

the passover lamb

“And it shall come to pass, when your children shall say to you, What do you mean by this service? That you shall say, It is the sacrifice of the LORD’S Passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when He smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses. And the people bowed the head and paid homage to the LORD.”

Exodus 12:26-27

God commanded Moses to speak to Israel concerning the Passover. The night before the exodus of Israel, God executed judgement throughout the oppressive land of Egypt (Exodus 12:1-12). His instructions to Israel were for each household to take a lamb and eat the meat in haste. Let us delve into the meaning of this particular Law of the Passover in order that we might keep it in its exact interpretation.

Heavenly Perspective

Many believe that Jesus physically resurrected after he was crucified. However, the Apostle Phillip says, “Those who say that the master/teacher first died and then rose up are in error, for he first arose and then died. If someone does not first attain to the resurrection, wouldn’t that person die? As God lives, that one would be dead already.” The Gospel of Phillip verse 15

Paul writes in his Epistle to the Ephesians, “But God, who is rich in mercy, for His great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead in sins, has quickened/awakened us together with Christ (by grace/purpose you are saved); and has raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in/with Christ Jesus;” Ephesians 2:4-6

John wrote in Revelation, “And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and first begotten of the dead.” Rev 1:5

Flesh & Blood, or Cracker & Grape Juice?

The Eucharist (i.e. Communion) is a ritual, which has been performed in religious masses all over the world for millennia.  The ritualistic rite of eating a cracker and drinking wine has been practiced since Babylon under the rule of Nimrod, King of Babylon.  In the Vatican, the Pope now wears that same crown of “Mystery, Babylon the Great” and holds, “a golden cup in her hand, making all nations drunk with the wine of her fornication” (Rev 17:2-5, 18:3).

Man shall not live by bread alone

Catholics and many religious sects are told that priests have the power to transform a cracker and wine into the flesh and blood of Jesus.  Protestants practice the same ritual but believe that the bread and wine are a symbol of Jesus.  Yet, the very man they think they’re reverencing by eating a piece of bread said:

“It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.” Matthew 4:4

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