Holy Spirit

The Jubilee, Sound the Trumpet

The word jubile can mean, ‘the sound of a trumpet,’ ‘a trumpet-blast of liberty’ and/or ‘a shout of joy’. A Trumpet is commanded to sound in the Jubilee Year as signal of the year of release for all the people who will hear the sound and come to the ingathering of the congregation. It is a day of great rejoicing for the House of Israel, a Day of Atonement, salvation, liberty, restoration and comfort. In days of ole, the Jubilee year was announced by a blast on a shofar, an instrument made from a ram’s horn, during that year’s Yom Kippur or Day of Atonement.

The priest blowing the shofar
The Jubilee Shofar or Ram’s Horn was the Trumpet Sound

The Spirit of Truth

Illuminating the Word of God

Seven weeks and a day have passed since the time of Passover.  To Christians, this day is referred to as Pentecost and is remembered as the day when the apostles received the Holy Spirit.  It was first celebrated by the Israelites seven weeks after they were passed over by the last plague and delivered out of oppression.   It has been known as the Feast of Weeks throughout generations of Hebrews ever since.  The disciples of Y’hoshua observed this time, just as their forefathers had, as stated in the Acts of the Apostles.

Apostles Refute the Apostles’ Creed

The Apostles Creed is recited across many of the “Christian” religions.  This creed is a “statement of faith” often used as part of baptismal ceremonies.  In the previous article on this subject, we showed that the apostles themselves would not even know the Apostles Creed.  It was fabricated three hundred years after Jesus and the Apostles under the influence of Babylonian, Greek, and Roman worship practices.  These practices are contrary to God’s Word.

Let’s look more closely at this creed and at what Jesus and the Apostles themselves had to say.  To begin, what exactly is the creed?

Not The Apostles Creed

The Apostles Creed is recognizable to most “Christians” in the world.

Does this sound familiar?

“I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth.  I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the virgin Mary…”

The creed is recited as part of the Roman Catholic Mass and baptism.  The Episcopalians, Lutherans and Methodists also recite the creed as part of their baptism rituals.  It may come as a surprise to the laity in the Protestant branches of Christianity to learn that Catholics recite the Apostles Creed and vice versa.  Why?  Because the Apostles Creed is a “statement of faith” and these different religions are taught that their religion is the correct religion, yet they all have the same “statement of faith.”  Even more surprising is that this creed cannot be found in the Bible or in any other writings by the Apostles.  So, where did it come from?

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